Neon Nights

With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs. Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City. This photo was submitted to Your

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Sandy Oasis

Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, is a nation of tranquility, but Sandy Island takes it to another level. This speck of sand in the bright blue waters is constantly reshaped by the ocean and weather, and visitors to the cay are encouraged to make reservations. Your Shot photographer

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Golden Hills

Your Shot photographer Hannah Overeem captured this shot of her dog, Badger, an Australian cattle dog, in Chino Hills, California. She writes that the contrast of the golden field and blue-and-white sky give this image a “surreal” look. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members

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Hidden Gem

Forged by the wear of water rushing over rocks, Olo Canyon in Arizona is concealed inside the Grand Canyon. Its alluring landscape includes natural springs and rocks shaped like cathedral amphitheaters. See more pictures from the September 2016 story ” Read more here:: http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/photography/photo-of-the-day/~3/fsLIa3hsI98/

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Behind the Curtain

Circus performers in Hanoi, Vietnam, prepare for the show minutes before it gets under way. Nguyen Thi Thu Hiep, shown here stretching, is a contortionist. For extra money, she also performs at private parties and social events. See more pictures from the September 2016 story ” Read more here:: http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/~r/ng/photography/photo-of-the-day/~3/0km_OCHzLic/

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Bushtit lady Solstice Canyon Southern California-107 – 7 Apr 2020 – Flickr

“…bushtit’s scientific name … basically translates to “small harp-player” (Psaltriparus, from psaltria, Greek for “female harp-player,” + parus, Latin for “titmouse,” from Icelandic tittr, “anything small,” + Anglo-Saxon mase, “small bird.” Minimus, as you might guess, just means “smallest.”) The “small” in the translation is obvious. The birds’ calls are

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